Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Spine and Spinal Disorders London,UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Prof. Dr. Walter Bini

Orthopedic department of Healthpoint Hospital in Abu Dhabi, UAE

Keynote: Surgery of lumbar spinal canal stenosis revisited. Less invasive approach options

Time : 09:30-10:10

Spine 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof. Dr. Walter Bini photo
Biography:

Walter Bini completed his diploma from Westminster School, Simsbury Connecticut, USA and his postgraduate degree from Universidad de Zaragoza , Facultad de Medicina, Zaragoza, Spain. In 2014 he became the Middle East Chairman of ISLASS. He was Head of Neurosurgery, Sheikh Khalifa General Hospital, UAQ-UAE from 2014-2016. Currently he is the lead neurosurgeon responsible for spinal surgery in the Waldkrankenhaus for Special Surgeries by Leipzig in Germany and also visiting consultant neurosurgeon, of the orthopaedic department of Healthpoint Hospital in Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Abstract:

Lumbar spinal stenosis ( LSS ) is characterized by a narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and/or the intervertebral foramina resulting from disc degeneration , bulging of the annulus, facet joint hypertrophy and infolding of the ligamentum flavum. With increase of the aging population and advances in diagnostic imaging capabilities, lumbar spinal stenosis in it's different stages or types is becoming more frequently diagnosed with an estimated prevalence of up to 13%. This , along with newer technical advances being introduced in the surgical management of LSS ,continues to pose a topic of discussion among neurologists as well as orthopedic and neurosurgeons as far as treatment strategies are concerned.

Especially the cases of moderate or "soft" stenosis ,very different than the bony or consolidated type, warrant a detailed analysis of the primary interspinous devices used for both types along with a proposal for a decision making protocol.

Based on our experience with the management of these two entities , we will focus on our results and future considerations with less invasive procedures which are proving over the last two decades to be a viable alternative for stenosis patients. Core of our presentation are our results with a minimal invasive procedure performed in 121 patients and their corresponding initial follow-up over 1 year with a 92% success rate evaluated by an independent observer. This is clearly in contrast with the 40-90% success rates and 14-35% complication rates reported and associated with standard decompression surgeries.

Furthermore, we will present our considerations of a further novel technique and the direction treatment options are developing towards with the corresponding scheduled clinical trial.

 

Spine 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof. W S El Masri photo
Biography:

Prof W S El Masri FRCS Ed; FRCP. Clinical Professor of Spinal Injuries - Keele University, Consultant Spinal Injuries – Hunters Moor Neurorehabilitation Centre Birmingham, Emeritus Consultant Surgeon in Spinal Injuries Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orth.Hospital . Founder Member and trustee of a number of charities that support Health Care professionals and patients. Raised about six million pounds from charity to rebuild and furnish the MCSI. Advisor to WHO ‘s International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury which was published in 2013 Member of the NICE Guideline Developing Group in spinal injuries. Obtained a number of awards including: the Medal of the International Spinal Cord Society, National Hospital Doctor Team Award for Innovation, Outstanding achievement award from the Chinese Society of Spinal Injuries, Outstanding Consultant Achievement award by the Spinal Injury Association, Hon. Presidency of the Romanian Spinal Cord Society and the prestigious Paul Harris Fellowship of the Rotary Club.

 

Abstract:

The management of  traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) has remained controversial since Charles Bell and Astley Cooper in the early 19th century. Better understanding of the Biomechanical Instability (BI) of the injured spine, the development of CT and MRI; better instrumentation and increased safety of anaesthetic agents have resulted in a change of practice from APCM of the spinal injury and all its effects for the majority patients to a focused surgical management of the injured spine.

Surgical stabilisation is undoubtedly beneficial to patients with injury of the bony spine without neurological damage. The patient can be discharged home within a few days of surgery.

Spinal Cord Injury results in a multi-system impairment and malfunction, paralysis, sensory loss and a potential wide range of medical and non-medical complications. The injured spinal cord is Physiologically Unstable and can be further damaged by non-mechanical factors such as hypoxia, hypertension, hypotension, sepsis, hypothermia, fluid overload most  of which can easily occur in patients with malfunction of almost every system of their body. These complications can magnify the secondary injury of the cord. Patients with spinal cord injury require scrupulous simultaneous attention of each of the effects of paralysis to ensure maximum neurological recovery, prevention of complications, protection of the injured cord, safe and convenient functioning of body systems, maximum independence to minimise cost of support in the community, enable the patient to remain healthy and contribute to the society as well as minimise readmission with complications.

The prognostic indications of neurological recovery following Active Physiological Conservative Management have been repeatedly well documented over the last seven decades. Although there is evidence that early surgical intervention may yield better outcomes than late intervention; the relevant outcomes of surgical intervention (early or late) have yet to be compared to those of APCM.

The significance of the BI, Canal encroachment and Traumatic Cord Compression as well as the possible advantages, disadvantages, complications of Surgical Stabilisation, Surgical Decompression and APCM will be discussed . The Outcomes of APCM will be demonstrated. The importance of future research and relevant outcomes to target will be highlighted .

The full text can be accessed free of charge from the following website addresses :  http://journals.sagepub.com/eprint/V9qda2SDWRT7fEMYttqF/full

http://rdcu.be/HB4K  

 

Keynote Forum

Prof. Dr. Thamer A. Hamdan

American Board (Nevada) & Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Basrah-Iraq

Keynote: Failed Lumbar surgery

Time : 11:25-12:05

Spine 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof. Dr. Thamer A. Hamdan photo
Biography:

Dr. Thamer Ahmed Hamdan is a Professor of Orthopaedic surgery, Teaching Hospital and Medical School. Chancellor of University of Basrah-Iraq. He is International Surgical Advisor, The Royal College of Surgeons (Edinburgh).

He is Iraqi Scientist Grade A. One of the outstanding people of the 20th century, Cambridge, U.K. Man of the year 2003, U.S.A. Gerhard Kuncher award winner, 2000. Distinguished Professor of the Iraqi Universities, 2003, the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research. International Award winner, AAOS, USA, 2005.

 

 

Abstract:

Failure of lumbar spine surgery is the unsatisfactory outcome of spine surgery, the pre-operative suffering may remain the same or even become worse, or a new symptom may appear. It is failure to alleviate pain or reverse the neurological deficit.

 

Failure of surgery results in patient disability, increased health cost and loss of patient work.

 

Failure may be due to failed surgeon or disease nature, Failed Surgeon means poor patient selection or wrong decision or bad Dissection.

 

Of the most causes of failed lumbar surgery includes recurrent disc herniation, Stenosis, Arachnoiditis, Epidural Fibrosis, Instability, Dural tear and Disc space infection.

 

To avoid failed lumbar surgery; the surgeon should treat the underlying cause or causes after a pin point diagnosis, Stabilize the patient personality

and psychology, Performing an optimal surgical technique and avoiding half way surgery as much as possible and lastly surgeon should not hesitate to re-operate if there is a solid base otherwise more failure will happen.

Always the best results are following the first surgery, Second procedure for failed first surgery had only 50% success rate and further procedure may worsened the patient condition

Keynote Forum

Prof.Majid Reza Farrokh

Shiraz Neuroscience Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Keynote: How to Do En-Bloc Sacrectomy for Large Sacral Tumors (A New Algorithm Approach)

Time : 12:05- 12:45

Spine 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof.Majid Reza Farrokh photo
Biography:

Prof. Majid Reza Farrokhi, now Professor of Neurosurgery, head of Shiraz Neuroscience Research Center, and Dean of Virtual School in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, completed his Specialty Degree in Neurosurgery in 1996 and Fellowship of Spine Surgery at Innsbruck University in 2004. He has been the Vice President of Iranian Board of Examiners in Neurosurgery since 2012 and hold the position of the Chairman of Neurosurgery Department of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2011-2014, Head of Fars and South of Iran AO-Spine Society in 2002-2005, and dean of Medical School, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences in 1996-1998. He has published more than 54 papers in reputed journals and 2 books and led several research projects. His investigations have been focused in spine.

 

Abstract:

Sacral tumors are rare pathologic conditions which can be benign or malignant. These tumors are a diagnostic challenge because patients often present with nonspecific complaints such as low back pain, sacrococcygeal joint pain, referred lag and buttock pain. Because of diagnostic and radiographic challenges, the detection of sacral mass can be delayed which complicates any prospect surgical intervention as tumors can be usually large in size at the time of treatment. Furthermore, the complex local anatomy of the sacrum and presence of numerous other structures make the resection procedure even more sophisticated. This study aims to evaluate the diagnosis, treatment and complication of 35 cases with large sacral mass. Of these patients with sacral mass who underwent tumor resection surgery, we performed posterior-only en-bloc tumor resection approach without nerve root sacrifice in 11 patients with different pathologies. Low back pain and pelvic pain were their most common symptoms. Tumors were larger than 10 centimeters in diameter and majority of them were involving the mid- and lower sacral and coccygeal portions; all were protruded more ventrally than dorsally. En-bloc tumor resection was achieved via hemi-sacrectomy in 1 patient while 8 others underwent total sacrectomy and partial removal of S1 vertebrae. Total resection of S1 was performed in 2 patients due to extensive tumor involvement of the mentioned portions. Patients were followed for 2 to 6 years post-operatively. Our findings showed that posterior only approaches for sacral tumors en-bloc resection surgery can be performed without sacrificing nerve roots. This is a faster and less invasive procedure than the combined approach and is feasible in carefully selected patients with variable pathologies.

Spine 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof. Dr. PPM Menchetti photo
Biography:

P.P.M. Menchetti, M.D., F.R.C.S.(US) ISLASS President, Orthopaedic Surgeon and Professor at Florence University, Italy

Aggregate Professor Palermo University (since 2015)

– Aggregate Professor Florence University (2004-2010) – Italy

– Aggregate Professor Neurosurgery Dept. Florence University (2009), Italy

– President ISLASS (International Society Laser Assisted Spine Surgery)

– Fellow Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of United States of America

– Fellow American Board Minimally Invasive Spine Medicine and Surgery

– Corresponding Fellow EFFORT (European Federation National Associations Orthopaedics and Traumatology)

– Member American Academy Minimally Invasive Spine Medicine and Surgery (AAMISMS)

 

Abstract:

Low back pain is the most common type of adult pain and is a leading cause of disability. While this complaint may be ubiquitous, there are many possible causes. Studies have shown that the sacroiliac joint is the cause in approximately 25% of patients with low back pain. The exact pattern is complex. Provocative physical examination maneuvers may help provide a presumptive sacroiliac joint pain diagnosis. Confirmatory diagnosis is achieved with diagnostic injection. For disabling pain that fails to respond to nonoperative treatment, surgical fusion may be necessary;

Minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion (SIJF) with triangular titanium implants has become an increasingly accepted surgical option for chronic sacroiliac (SI) joint dysfunction: different prospective and RCT studies proven that this approach is safe and more effective than CM in relieving pain, reducing disability, and improving patient function and quality of life.

 

Keynote Forum

Prof. Dr. Walter Bini

Orthopedic department of Healthpoint Hospital in Abu Dhabi, UAE

Keynote: Personal Experience and Views concerning ACDF

Time : 14:40-15:05

Spine 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prof. Dr. Walter Bini photo
Biography:

Walter Bini completed his diploma from Westminster School, Simsbury Connecticut, USA and his postgraduate degree from Universidad de Zaragoza , Facultad de Medicina, Zaragoza, Spain. In 2014 he became the Middle East Chairman of ISLASS. He was Head of Neurosurgery, Sheikh Khalifa General Hospital, UAQ-UAE from 2014-2016. Currently he is the lead neurosurgeon responsible for spinal surgery in the Waldkrankenhaus for Special Surgeries by Leipzig in Germany and also visiting consultant neurosurgeon, of the orthopaedic department of Healthpoint Hospital in Abu Dhabi, UAE.

 

Abstract:

Even with and in the presence of „motion-preserving“ options, ACDF still occupies and offers many patients with c-spine degenerative conditions the technique or method of choice .
Based on my own personal experience , supported by a surgical video , the fundamental considerations will be addressed of why this technique still remains the golden standard in a large collective of patients.
Clear patient-pathology findings in relation to possible technical options need to be critically taken into consideration and not just decide based on the „new“ or more „appealing“ market innovation